We Inherited A Gambian Economy In Decline, Laments Barrow

We Inherited A Gambian Economy In Decline, Laments Barrow

After 22 years of suffering under the despotic rule of his predecessor, President Adama Barrow of The Gambia, on Saturday promised a fresh start for his people and the economy, which he said is on the decline.
Speaking at his formal inauguration to coincide with the country’s 52nd independence anniversary, Barrow plans to deliberately focus on the economy of West Africa’s smallest nation state, which depends on exports of groundnuts from small-scale farming and hard currency from thousands of tourists drawn to its long sandy beaches and lively resorts.
He plans to immediately begin the task of encouraging investment in other sectors such as technology, as part of the promised sweeping reforms, in addition to announcing the introduction of free primary education, as guaranteed by the country’s constitution but was not implemented during the 22-year rule of predecessor- Yahyah Jammeh, now on exile in Equitorial Guinea.
The new leader who promised that under his watch, The Gambia would “remain a beacon of peace and hope for others to draw lessons from,” has already set free many political prisoners, as it moves to rejoin international institutions such as the International Criminal Court and the Commonwealth.
He also pledged to re-build institutions that had been hollowed out under Jammeh. During his rule, Gambia’s Supreme Court judges fled the country and the press was muzzled.
Barrow, who was sworn into office a month ago during a brief exile in Senegal, when Jammeh refused to accept his defeat in a December election expressed gratitude to leaders of West African nations, particularly Senegal’s President Macky Sall, who he described as Chief Guest of Honour, for making his ascension to office a reality.
Other leaders at the occasion included Prime Minister of Guinea Bissau Umaro Sissco Embalo; Presidents Nana Akufo-Addo of Ghana; Roch Marc Christian Kabore of Burkina Faso; as well as Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz of Mauritania. President Barrow also specially recognized President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the Chair of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) “who undertook the first mediation efforts.”
He told the gathering: “Few people would have thought that I’d be standing here today,” Barrow said, wearing a traditional flowing white robe with gold trim.
“For 22 years, the Gambian people yearned to live in a country where our diverse tribes will be bridged by tolerance and our determination to work together for the common good,” he said.
For Barrow, who has since removed the “Islamic” in the country’s name, the new slogan is: “One Gambia, one nation, one people.”